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Viewing topic "MOX8 SAVED SONGS EXPORT"

   
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Posted on: May 04, 2018 @ 09:31 AM
beh
Total Posts:  10
Joined  04-27-2018
status: Newcomer
philwoodmusic - 03 May 2018 09:35 PM

I see.

You probably should have titled this thread “How do I make an mp3 of my MOX song” because with a MIDI data export, all you’ve really done is moved your song data elsewhere (to Cubase) and you are not really any closer to making an audio file, at this point, than you were when your song was happily playing in song mode on your MOX.

There are two good ways to make an audio file from a song on your MOX:

1) - The MOX is in itself an audio interface, and you can use the USB ‘To Host’ to digitally record your music to an audio track in Cubase.

2) - If you already have a separate audio interface for your computer, you can record the MOX’s left and right analog outputs with it, again to an audio track in Cubase.

Once you’ve done that, you can export an audio file from Cubase which can then be converted to an mp3.  Your version of Cubase may or may not export directly to mp3, too, saving you that extra conversion.

If your song is complete as it is and you just want an audio file of it to listen to, or to put on CD then the task is fairly straight forward.

If you need to record each instrument separately on its own audio track in Cubase, for mixing and processing, then it becomes a little bit more complicated, because you have to keep the separate recordings in musical time with each other.

It depends what you want to do.

There are many forum posts here about either way, both for the MOX and MOXF, because they both work the same way for this particular subject.

Thank you Philwoodmusic.  I don’t know how I could learn from basic to advance for both “how to operate MOX” and “how to use Cubase”.  I purchased the MOX8 but it feels like sitting in an airplane’s pilot seat and not knowing how to fly.  I know MOX is very powerful but unfortunately there is no single source of A to Z for learning and mastering it.  There are forums and discussions everywhere but for a beginner like me it’s easy to get lost in forums because if I’m trying to learn the “B” from the alphabet, I find a subject on a forum about “B” but then in the discussion comes a lot of “C”, “D”, ...."Z" terms which are undefined to me and would make it confusing.
You’ve been very helpful thanks.

  [ Ignore ]  

Posted on: May 04, 2018 @ 04:48 PM
philwoodmusic
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Total Posts:  920
Joined  07-01-2013
status: Guru

The point you’re at is a common choke point for many users.

Recording your own music as audio is a big step up in terms of complexity.  You are basically expected to dip your toe into the world of recording studio techniques and audio theory, including digital audio theory, in this case.

That’s a lot for someone to take on if they’ve just bought a workstation for the first time and haven’t spent any time around recording studio equipment.

It all takes time and work, but the results are very gratifying, and really, it should take time, it’s not like learning MS Word or an extension of home or business computing.  You’re expected to be part of a very technical art form, with a lot of history, and that’s AFTER you’ve written your music.

Putting together a song in Song Mode might be a 2 or 3 on the 1-10 difficulty scale, but creating audio tracks and files of it is much higher up the scale and possibly in the 7, 8, or 9 range, depending on what needs to be done.

The jump can be tough for many people.

In fact, some people never get past the difference between MIDI data and audio.  Commonly quite clever people, too. 

At times, the concepts can feel quite abstract.

  [ Ignore ]  

Posted on: May 05, 2018 @ 12:58 PM
beh
Total Posts:  10
Joined  04-27-2018
status: Newcomer
philwoodmusic - 04 May 2018 04:48 PM

The point you’re at is a common choke point for many users.

Recording your own music as audio is a big step up in terms of complexity.  You are basically expected to dip your toe into the world of recording studio techniques and audio theory, including digital audio theory, in this case.

That’s a lot for someone to take on if they’ve just bought a workstation for the first time and haven’t spent any time around recording studio equipment.

It all takes time and work, but the results are very gratifying, and really, it should take time, it’s not like learning MS Word or an extension of home or business computing.  You’re expected to be part of a very technical art form, with a lot of history, and that’s AFTER you’ve written your music.

Putting together a song in Song Mode might be a 2 or 3 on the 1-10 difficulty scale, but creating audio tracks and files of it is much higher up the scale and possibly in the 7, 8, or 9 range, depending on what needs to be done.

The jump can be tough for many people.

In fact, some people never get past the difference between MIDI data and audio.  Commonly quite clever people, too. 

At times, the concepts can feel quite abstract.

Thanks.  The complexity of learning how to make and record the music is a fun challenge, given that no extended gap would come in the process of learning.  Thanks for all your guides and insights.

  [ Ignore ]  


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