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Viewing topic "convert vsti’s/samples to motif xf format?"

     
Posted on: May 05, 2012 @ 02:07 AM
jason666
Total Posts:  34
Joined  03-23-2012
status: Regular

Hi guys,

Is there a tool to convert vsti’s or samples to
the motif xf format?
thanks

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Posted on: May 05, 2012 @ 06:46 AM
meatballfulton
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Total Posts:  3017
Joined  01-25-2005
status: Guru

There are some roundabout ways to do it. I have tried some of these but never been really satisfied with any of them.

1. Motif Creator from Chicken Systems

This can convert from many sample formats (including Kontakt and NN-XT) to Motif XF voices.  I experimented with this and found that the sample sets I converted were very inefficient in memory usage (i.e. they were meant for use on a computer) and required more RAM space than they were worth. Also the overall levels seemed low. The same samples used in Reason NN-XT (for which they were meant) sounded much better.

2. Waveform Editor from John Melas

This one only converts GigaStudio, AKAI and Sound Font (SF2) files. I haven’t used it because I don’t have any samples in the above formats.

3. Loading Raw Samples

If the sample set provides WAV or AIFF format (44.1/16) you can load and edit them in the XF or use one of the above tools. You will have to do your own looping and zoning, then create an XF voice using the samples. Very old school and labor intensive but might be worth it for you.

4. Direct Sampling

Useful for capturing sounds from VSTis. Program a short sequence in the XF to play the notes you need from the VST (don’t forget multiple velocity levels!), record the output, edit/loop the individual samples, then it’s like #3 above.

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Posted on: May 05, 2012 @ 06:13 PM
DavePolich
Total Posts:  6820
Joined  07-27-2002
status: Guru

The real-world, practical answer is no, there is no tool or program that
automatically converts “VSTi’s or samples to Motif format voices.

Yes, you can in theory record the sound output of a VSTi into the Motif.
But that is just one sound on one key. If you were to record the entire
duration of every key of a sound, you’d use up all the available RAM in
the Motif (you can’t record, or sample, directly to a flashboard),

Furthermore, most sample-based “VSTi’s” employ thousands of samples
mapped into waveforms that total up to gigabytes in size. You’d never
have enough memory to load gigabytes of samples, even if you knew how to loop and map them (another subject of discussion entirely).

Here’s my advice - just use your Motif to trigger VSTi sounds that run on your computer. If you absolutely have to have them for a live show, put your VSTi host (like Cubase or Sonar or whatevr) on a laptop, hook up a
MIDI/audio interface to the laptop, hook up your Motif to the interface,
and trigger the sounds that way.

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Posted on: May 06, 2012 @ 07:18 AM
californiamusic
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Total Posts:  125
Joined  08-10-2003
status: Pro

I’ve done this a few times with a program called SampleRobot.  It’s an automated program that samples VST’s or other keyboards and converts the samples into a Sondfont or other format.  Then I used the John Melas Wave Editor to convert that Soundfont to Motif format.  There were a few sounds I really wanted in my XF, so I went through this whole process 8 or 9 times. 

Like they’ve said above, depending on how well you want to sample something and the type of sound your sampling, it can take up alot of memory. ; )

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Posted on: May 06, 2012 @ 02:32 PM
benoit
Total Posts:  173
Joined  08-19-2009
status: Pro

And that is why I always ask myself how can all motif sounds fit into a ROM memory, even 741 Mb.

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Posted on: October 06, 2012 @ 06:12 PM
anotherscott
Total Posts:  640
Joined  06-30-2010
status: Guru
californiamusic - 06 May 2012 07:18 AM

I’ve done this a few times with a program called SampleRobot.  It’s an automated program that samples VST’s or other keyboards and converts the samples into a Sondfont or other format.  Then I used the John Melas Wave Editor to convert that Soundfont to Motif format.

Once you use Wave Editor to convert the Soundfont to Motif format, what exactly do you have? That is, do you only have the wave files themselves, or do they come across with their other parameters (i.e. mapping of the waves to the appropriate keys and velocities)? I guess what I’m really getting at is, once you have converted the SF2 file to a format you can load into the XF’s flash, how much more is involved to actually create a Voice from it?

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Posted on: October 06, 2012 @ 06:46 PM
moxrox
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Total Posts:  436
Joined  11-27-2011
status: Enthusiast
benoit - 06 May 2012 02:32 PM

And that is why I always ask myself how can all motif sounds fit into a ROM memory, even 741 Mb.

The short answer is that they can’t.  There isn’t a separate sample for each note, velocity, element, voice, etc.  thefreedictionary.com defines “sample” as “a portion, piece, or segment that is representative of a whole.” This is what is stored in the Motif waveforms: portions and pieces that are representative of the whole.  The Motif uses these pieces to synthesize the whole.

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Posted on: October 07, 2012 @ 12:26 AM
bonivyr
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Joined  11-15-2011
status: Pro
benoit - 06 May 2012 02:32 PM

And that is why I always ask myself how can all motif sounds fit into a ROM memory, even 741 Mb.

---------------------------------------
- Yamaha Motif XS8 Full Concert Grand -
---------------------------------------
FILE & SETUP:
- dp_bsd_v1.3_Yamaha_MotifXS8_FullConcertGrand.mp3
PROS:
- Looping isn’t too obnoxious @ lows & mids.
- Decent dynamic range (~33dB, vel=1:127).
- 3 layer sample set (waveform & spectral phase displays).
- Layer switch @ vel=70, 106.
- Sympathetic resonance, though it’s fairly fake sounding - echoy and reverby.
- Key-up samples of some sort, though it sounds like a strange tone.
- Responds to partial pedaling.
CONS:
- Fairly quick note decay with some buzzing near the noise floor (could be a recording issue).
- Obviously looped.
- Samples are 3 to 1 seconds (lo to hi) with 1.5 to 0.5 seconds of crossfade.
- Lower & mid looping rather realistically wobbly, highs unrealistically loopy.
- Obviously stretched, group transitions fairly audible.
- Stretch distances: 2,3(x10),2,3,4,3,3,4,2,4,2,3,1,2,1,2,3(x5),5 = 31 groups.
- Obvious velocity layer switching, some kind of filter switch as well @ v=50.
- No pedal samples.
OTHER:

technology of 1980 )

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