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Viewing topic "On stage main speakers set question"

     
Posted on: July 03, 2010 @ 11:59 AM
wizzywizz
Total Posts:  47
Joined  06-19-2009
status: Regular

Dear All,

I have a question. Does anyone know any low budget active main speaker set’s that are good value for money? I am at a loss when I browse through the possibilities ranging from a 700,- to whopping 8000,- (or even more). What should I be looking for? Our band consists of:

- 1 lead singer, 3 background voices
- 1 Yamaha Motif XS8 and 1 Yamaha MO8
- 2 electric guitars (separate amps)
- 1 Bass guitar (separate amp)
- 1 Accoustic drum

Genre: Mainly british pop (Coldplay, etc) but also Muse, Peter Gabriel, etc.

Our gigs are currently small outdoor garden gigs (weddings, etc.) and bars. Currently we rent our equipement.

Is the HK Audio Soundhouse One any good (150Watt L+R active speakers with a 300 Watt active subwoofer)?

Any advise would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!

Kind regards,

WizzyWizz

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Posted on: July 04, 2010 @ 09:45 AM
Bad_Mister
Avatar
Total Posts:  36648
Joined  07-30-2002
status: Moderator

It is always difficult to make this type of decision but we can offer some guidelines - you will have to apply it to your situation.

Since you play outdoors and in bars, you want to look at a system that is generally “long throw” - able to project into the acoustic space.

Your band’s ability to play WITH each other will be important. Hearing yourself is an important thing. As the singer’s will atest, if you cannot hear yourself you cannot really sing in tune and be comfortable.

You have at least 3 maybe 4 rogue musicians. I don’t mean anything derogatory by this - I just mean the 2 guitars, the bass and most likely the drummer will not be dependent on this speaker system.

How much wattage are the guitar and bass using?

This must be considered. Because if the keyboards are out gunned you will have problems. Also you know the players - are they likely to control their own volume for the sake of the band’s sound or are they likely to GO FOR IT and drown everyone else out.

You have to be honest with yourself and your situation.

Because the Vocals and the Keyboards will depend on the speaker system - it is obvious you need a full range system.

The Sub-woofer is of less importance for the keys and vocals - would be useful for extended dance bass and/or kick drum. You don’t really say if the drums are going to be mic’d and run through the system. If yes, the sub-woofer would be useful. But for keyboards and vocals, not so much (in my opinion).

Power to spare. Get a system that has power to spare. You do not have to use the extra power but a system that is straining to sound loud enough - always sounds terrible “the band was too loud”.

A system that sounds like it has more to give and is loud enough - always sounds great to the listener. “The band was loud but it was not annoying!”

Only guitar amps should sound like they are straining. (lol).

There are several ways to go: Completely modular or a bit less completely modular.

A separate Mixer, power amps and speakers
A powered mixer and speakers
A mixer and powered speakers

Which is better? They all exist to fill a need. It is not which is better, it is which is better for your situation.

Weight and moving is a consideration
Setup and running the system is another consideration

If you have roadies and a sound crew, (then, indeed, life is grand)… most likely you don’t - again this is for you to decide based on your band.

Don’t skimp on any component - for example, if you get a cheapo mixer don’t expect your great speakers to make up for it. And vice versa… Try and get components that are on the same level of quality.

Another important point: Speakers should be aimed at the audiences ears.

Sounds like a no-brainer. But you would be amazed at how many bands do not aim their speakers at the audience. They either send the sound out too low or too high. Aim them at the majority of the people you want to reach, not so the people in the cheap seats can hear… they are called cheap seats for a reason (basically because the sound is not aimed at them). If you play weddings where folks dance - you want to concentrate the sound on the dance floor. Yet you need the speakers to “speak” well (for speeches and toasts, etc).

If you are on a stage you need to be able to aim the speaker down to the audience. If you are on the same level as the audience you need to raise the speakers up to ear level. Not over their heads but at their ears. No-brainer, you say, next time you see a band with their own gear grade them 1-10 on if they “get this” concept. (lol)

Monitor speakers… don’t ever overlook the necessity of monitor speakers. If you can hear yourself, you can play (or sing) better). Save money for hearing yourself… in some ways this is where you should definitely not skimp at all (especially if you want to enjoy playing and ultimately have others enjoy your playing). For this small personal powered cabinets are a wonderful solution.

Anyway that should get you started. Your a band - this is an investment - figure out what you are making money-wise and recognize that sometimes what you really should get is a bit more pricey - but is actually only 1 or 2 more gigs worth of money… when looking at it over a year’s worth of gigs… it is always better to err on the side of getting what you want!!!

Hope that helps.

  [ Ignore ]  

Posted on: July 04, 2010 @ 11:13 AM
wizzywizz
Total Posts:  47
Joined  06-19-2009
status: Regular

Hello Bad_Mister!

Those are some great tips! Thanks a lot! Price-wise, is it true that the more expensive the gear is, the better the quality is? And how can I recognise a ‘long-throw’ speaker set? Or is that a question of wattage?
Your question regarding the drum.l normally we send the kick and a overhead through the main speakers as well, so a separate woofer would be nice, right?

The guitars have 80 Watt amps and the bass 100 Watts.

Thanks for the insight!

Kind regards,

WizzyWizz

Bad_Mister - 04 July 2010 09:45 AM

It is always difficult to make this type of decision but we can offer some guidelines - you will have to apply it to your situation.

Since you play outdoors and in bars, you want to look at a system that is generally “long throw” - able to project into the acoustic space.

Your band’s ability to play WITH each other will be important. Hearing yourself is an important thing. As the singer’s will atest, if you cannot hear yourself you cannot really sing in tune and be comfortable.

You have at least 3 maybe 4 rogue musicians. I don’t mean anything derogatory by this - I just mean the 2 guitars, the bass and most likely the drummer will not be dependent on this speaker system.

How much wattage are the guitar and bass using?

This must be considered. Because if the keyboards are out gunned you will have problems. Also you know the players - are they likely to control their own volume for the sake of the band’s sound or are they likely to GO FOR IT and drown everyone else out.

You have to be honest with yourself and your situation.

Because the Vocals and the Keyboards will depend on the speaker system - it is obvious you need a full range system.

The Sub-woofer is of less importance for the keys and vocals - would be useful for extended dance bass and/or kick drum. You don’t really say if the drums are going to be mic’d and run through the system. If yes, the sub-woofer would be useful. But for keyboards and vocals, not so much (in my opinion).

Power to spare. Get a system that has power to spare. You do not have to use the extra power but a system that is straining to sound loud enough - always sounds terrible “the band was too loud”.

A system that sounds like it has more to give and is loud enough - always sounds great to the listener. “The band was loud but it was not annoying!”

Only guitar amps should sound like they are straining. (lol).

There are several ways to go: Completely modular or a bit less completely modular.

A separate Mixer, power amps and speakers
A powered mixer and speakers
A mixer and powered speakers

Which is better? They all exist to fill a need. It is not which is better, it is which is better for your situation.

Weight and moving is a consideration
Setup and running the system is another consideration

If you have roadies and a sound crew, (then, indeed, life is grand)… most likely you don’t - again this is for you to decide based on your band.

Don’t skimp on any component - for example, if you get a cheapo mixer don’t expect your great speakers to make up for it. And vice versa… Try and get components that are on the same level of quality.

Another important point: Speakers should be aimed at the audiences ears.

Sounds like a no-brainer. But you would be amazed at how many bands do not aim their speakers at the audience. They either send the sound out too low or too high. Aim them at the majority of the people you want to reach, not so the people in the cheap seats can hear… they are called cheap seats for a reason (basically because the sound is not aimed at them). If you play weddings where folks dance - you want to concentrate the sound on the dance floor. Yet you need the speakers to “speak” well (for speeches and toasts, etc).

If you are on a stage you need to be able to aim the speaker down to the audience. If you are on the same level as the audience you need to raise the speakers up to ear level. Not over their heads but at their ears. No-brainer, you say, next time you see a band with their own gear grade them 1-10 on if they “get this” concept. (lol)

Monitor speakers… don’t ever overlook the necessity of monitor speakers. If you can hear yourself, you can play (or sing) better). Save money for hearing yourself… in some ways this is where you should definitely not skimp at all (especially if you want to enjoy playing and ultimately have others enjoy your playing). For this small personal powered cabinets are a wonderful solution.

Anyway that should get you started. Your a band - this is an investment - figure out what you are making money-wise and recognize that sometimes what you really should get is a bit more pricey - but is actually only 1 or 2 more gigs worth of money… when looking at it over a year’s worth of gigs… it is always better to err on the side of getting what you want!!!

Hope that helps.

  [ Ignore ]  

Posted on: July 04, 2010 @ 09:02 PM
ktrooster
Avatar
Total Posts:  106
Joined  02-25-2010
status: Pro

Hello Bad Mister,

I wonder if you’re familiar with the Bose L1 Model 1 speaker system. Bose professes these to be a compact onstage speaker that packs a punch and there’s “no need for a separate monitor or PA system.” Therefore, have you heard or experience this system?

I think they might me nice for a solo player, but have no idea how they would sound with a complete band (bass, drums, etc.)

Thanks,
KT

  [ Ignore ]  

Posted on: July 29, 2010 @ 06:05 AM
dcool
Avatar
Total Posts:  426
Joined  11-01-2006
status: Enthusiast

Sound awesome, audience will hear what you hear. Check your local store

  [ Ignore ]  


 
     


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